Officials got rid of an abandoned road culvert. Now migrating fish can swim freely

An aerial view of workers from the James River Association, DWR, USFWS and the Virginia...
An aerial view of workers from the James River Association, DWR, USFWS and the Virginia Department of Forestry planting live stakes, trees and herbaceous vegetation where Nobles Road used to intersect Flowerdew Hundred Creek.(James River Association)
Published: Oct. 24, 2022 at 8:05 AM EDT
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Flowerdew Hundred Creek weaves through a forested landscape in Prince George County on the south bank of the James River. Surrounded by land often examined by archaeologists due to its rich cultural history, the creek contains a story of its own that wildlife officials are working to preserve.

Earlier this year, officials took steps to benefit Flowerdew Hundred Creek’s unique ecology by removing a culvert, or small tunnel that funnels water underneath a roadway, that was identified as a barrier to fish passage.

In March, the Virginia Department of Transportation decommissioned Nobles Road, and workers removed the culvert and replaced it with a natural stream channel, allowing the unrestricted passage of aquatic wildlife.

The project, which was funded with a $50,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, led to the reconnection of nearly 2 miles of potential river herring spawning habitat.

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NBC12 is a partner with The Virginia Mercury, an independent, nonprofit online news...
NBC12 is a partner with The Virginia Mercury, an independent, nonprofit online news organization covering state government and policy.(Virginia Mercury)