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An active week following Sunday’s full moon

Full Moon from Staunton Saturday night
Full Moon from Staunton Saturday night(Tony Alverson)
Published: Aug. 4, 2021 at 4:19 PM EDT|Updated: Aug. 22, 2021 at 11:49 PM EDT
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(WHSV) - After the full moon Sunday night, there are still quite a few events going on up in the sky this week.

Losing Daylight

Over the next week, we will lose 16 minutes of daylight. By Sunday August 29th, sunrise will move from 6:36 am to 6:42 am and sunset will move from 7:59 pm to 7:49 pm. This will bring us down to 13 hours and 7 minutes of daylight and up to 10 hours and 53 minutes of darkness.

ISS Viewing (Most Viewable)

DateVisibleMax HeightAppearsDisappears
August 25th, 5:22 am5 min66°above SSWabove NE
August 28th, 4:40 am3 min47°above NNEabove NE

Moon Phases & Next Full Moon:

Moon PhaseDate and Time
Third Quarter MoonAugust 30th, 3:13 am
New MoonSeptember 6th, 8:51 pm
Full MoonSeptember 13th, 4:39 pm
First Quarter MoonSeptember 20th, 7:54 pm

Next Full Moon

The next full moon will be on September 20th and it is known as the Harvest Moon. This is the time of the year when corn is harvested. Other known names for September’s full moon are the Corn Maker Moon and Corn Harvest Moon referring to harvesting corn. This full moon is also known as the Autumn Moon, Leaves Turning Moon, Moon of Brown Leaves, or Yellow Leaf Moon. These names are for the upcoming fall season. The Child Moon, Mating Moon, and Rutting Moon are also names as young animals are weaned at this time of the year along with it being mating season for many animals.

Other Interesting Events

On August 25th, Lyra’s parallelogram will have double stars. The stars that form this parallelogram can be seen with sharp eyes or binoculars. The stars that form the parallelogram include Zeta Lyrae, Sheliak, Sulafat, and Lambda Lyrae. The stars will be visible in a parallelogram all night Wednesday night.

Wednesday night, a set of stars will shape a parallelogram in the sky
Wednesday night, a set of stars will shape a parallelogram in the sky(Stellarium)

On August 27th, the Teapot in Sagittarius will tilt. The Teapot is a star pattern with a flat bottom formed by the stars Ascella and Kaus Australis. A pointed spout is formed by the stars Alnasl and Kaus Borealis. The stars Nunki and Tau Sagittarii form the handle while the stars Kaus Borealis, Meridianalis, and Australis refer to the anchor’s bow. This formation reaches maximum height in the south around 10 pm and it will look like it’s serving a hot beverage. The Milky Way adds to the illustration as steam.

Friday night a set of stars will show a tilting teapot, making for a nice illustration.
Friday night a set of stars will show a tilting teapot, making for a nice illustration.(Stellarium)

Also on August 27th, the bright waning gibbous will pass close to Uranus for the second time this month. You’ll be able to see this once the moon has climbed enough up in the sky past the treetops. Uranus will be sitting several finger widths to the Moon’s upper left. You can see Uranus and the Moon in a single pair of binoculars as Uranus will be a blue-green dot.

Uranus will be to the upper left of the Moon Friday night.
Uranus will be to the upper left of the Moon Friday night.(Stellarium)

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