'Oh, my gosh dude': Navy video shows unexplained encounter - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

'Oh, my gosh dude': Navy video shows unexplained encounter

The pilot was flying a U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet. (Source: AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere) The pilot was flying a U.S. Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet. (Source: AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere)

(RNN) – A new video has been released showing an unidentified aircraft moving at high speed low over the water, captured by a Navy pilot’s tracking system.

The video was released by the To The Stars Academy Of Arts & Science, an organization that has previously released similar military footage of encounters with unexplained aircraft. Some of its backers include former defense officials and was founded by a former member of the rock band Blink-182, Tom DeLonge.

The video was taken in 2015 at an unknown location. It shows the pilot’s infrared tracking sensor locking onto a small, white circular object moving at high speed in a straight line over the water. The pilot exclaims, “Whoa! Got it!” when he locks on.

A counterpart can be heard laughing and sounds excited. They say things like “Oh, my gosh dude,” and “Wow! What is that man?”

“Look at that flying!” one of them says.

While the object meets the technical definition of the term "unidentified flying object" (UFO), To The Stars makes no claims about matters such as extraterrestrial origin.

To The Stars said it was a Department of Defense video, captured from an F/A-18 Super Hornet jet with a Raytheon-developed infrared system.

“The object in this video remains unidentified,” the organization says on its website.

In the organization’s write-up, it identifies some unusual observations, which include no visible wings or tails on the object and no exhaust plume. The write-up claims these would be easily visible on conventional aircraft, even on a cruise missile in the case of its wings or tail.

In December members of To The Stars were featured in an expansive New York Times piece. Luis Elizondo, a former military intelligence officer who ran the secretive Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program at the Pentagon, is now the academy’s director of global security and special programs.

Elizondo resigned from his Defense Department post in October, asking, “Why aren’t we spending more time and effort on this issue?” in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.

His letter warned of the “many accounts from the Navy and other services of unusual aerial systems interfering with military weapon platforms and displaying beyond-next-generation capabilities,” The Times reported.

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