Woman 'shocked' after 27 contact lenses removed from her eye - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Woman 'shocked' after 27 contact lenses removed from her eye

A woman's eye that most likely does not have 27 contact lenses in it. (Source: Pixabay) A woman's eye that most likely does not have 27 contact lenses in it. (Source: Pixabay)

(RNN) - Doctors removed 27 contact lenses from a woman's eye that she somehow claimed to not know were there.

The BBC reported a large fused together mass of 17 of the lenses constituted a "bluish foreign body" in her eye that, again, she somehow claimed to not know were there.

Another 10 lenses were found hanging out in the same eye.

"Optometry Today" quoted a doctor saying the patient was "quite shocked."

So were the doctors. The woman did not complain of irritation and thought the discomfort was due to dry eyes and getting old. She did, however, report - rather obviously - her eyes felt better after the lenses were removed.

The woman was being treated for cataracts, which a clouding of the eye. Leaving 27 contact lenses in one eye causes a different type of clouding. The cataract surgery was postponed after the contact lenses were found due to an increased risk of infection.

Reportedly the patient was using monthly disposable lenses but did not follow up with routine appointments or, apparently, bother actually disposing of them.

The lenses were found in November 2016, but the report was only recently published in the "British Medical Journal."

The BBC included a list of tips for contact lens wearers, such as not applying eye makeup before putting them in, washing hands before handling them and not wearing lenses longer than advised by the doctor.

Here another tip: Don't put multiple lenses in the same eye, especially not 27 of them.

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

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