Mother of murdered RVA 12-year-old keeping her memory alive - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Mother of murdered RVA 12-year-old keeping her memory alive

Amiya Moses (Source: United Communities Against Crime) Amiya Moses (Source: United Communities Against Crime)
RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) -

Last December, 12-year-old Amiya Moses was shot and killed while playing in her front yard. Now her mother is renewing efforts to stop the violence and to get kids off the streets and in school.

The second annual Amiya Moses Scholarship Fundraiser is on Saturday. There will be a bowling tournament at Shrader Lanes at 8037 Shrader Road in Henrico. The time of the tournament has not been announced.

All the money raised will go towards a scholarship for Richmond high school seniors wanting to pursue a degree in criminal justice. Applicants are required to submit a one-page essay on “Why I want to pursue a degree in criminal justice”.

Youth took to the basketball court and raised $3,000 in the first annual Scholarship drive in honor of Moses, gunned down outside her Old Brook Road home.

"I still see my daughter in the casket every time I close my eyes," said Kele Wright.

Mom is determined to make sure her daughter's name live on.

This year, the family is trading the basketball court for a bowling tournament…where again all the money raised will go towards a scholarship for Richmond high school seniors wanting to pursue a degree in criminal justice…

"You are shooting into crowds and you are hitting innocent children. My daughter is not going to be able to go to college. She's turning 13, and I can't celebrate...I am going to celebrate her birthday, but she's not here to celebrate her 13th Birthday," said Wright.

Amiya's mother is planning to go back to that location where her daughter was killed to sing happy birthday and release purple and white balloons, Amiya's favorite colors.

"It's just to let her know that we didn't forget about you," said Wright.

A George Wythe senior received the first Amiya Moses Scholarship award. Mom is pledging to continue the tradition and, hopefully, she says this will bring a stop to some of the violence.

"It has to stop. It has to stop. We are burying our children. We are burying our loved ones," said Wright. "I can't hug her. I can't kiss her. I can't call her on the phone and tell her I love her."

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