Chesterfield residents spend days with no hot water - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

On Your Side: Chesterfield residents spend days with no hot water

CHESTERFIELD, VA (WWBT) -

 

Chesterfield neighbors called 12 On Your Side to complain about spending days with no hot water.

The gas was shut off at Remuda Crossing Apartments, but residents paid rent that is supposed to include water and gas. 

"I think we are getting ripped off quite honestly," said concerned resident Donald Smith.

Smith did not have hot water for at least two days. 

"No hot water to clean up...take a shower...to clean the kids," said Smith. "Nothing." 

Smith was shocked to find a lock was placed on the gas line in the back of his building.

"I paid my share," said Smith. "I paid my rent, and that gas bill was supposed to have been paid."

We went straight to the management office for answers.

"Can I contact my home office so someone can talk to you?" said the manager in the office.

He left the room to make a call and returned with a short statement.

"It has been taken care of," replied the manager.

Smith couldn't help celebrating when crews arrived.

"I was quite happy," said Smith. "I'm just sorry it took so long."

 

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