Fort Lee security unchanged after Fort Hood shooting - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Fort Lee security unchanged after Fort Hood shooting; soldiers set to deploy to Afghanistan and Kuwait Thursday

FORT LEE, VA (WWBT) -

Following the second shooting in five years at Fort Hood, Fort Lee has made it known that it has not changed its security protocols.

The commanding officer, Colonel Paul Brooks, said the procedures at the base remain "unchanged and operating as normal," while adding, "I'm asking all post leaders to immediately review active shooter and shelter-in-place plans."

He then said he's reminding all personnel at Fort Lee that if they "see something, say something."

An Iraq veteran opened fire at Fort Hood on Wednesday, killing three people and injuring 16, before shooting himself. This comes after a Fort Hood shooting in 2009 that resulted in 13 deaths.

At Fort Lee, Family and friends will bid farewell to soldiers departing for Afghanistan and Kuwait on Thursday. The deployment involves a detachment of soldiers from the 111th Quartermaster Company, and it will last six months. The farewell will be at 1 p.m.

Fort Lee is home to an average of 34,000 troops on any given day.

Copyright 2014 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

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