Tubing accident kills boy, sends another to hospital - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Tubing accident kills boy, sends another to hospital

PRINCE GEORGE, VA (WWBT) -

Investigators with the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries this morning will be back on the scene of a deadly tubing accident in Prince George County.

It happened Saturday night in a body of water known as Butterworth Pond, located off Lanier Road. A 10-year old boy was killed, and now a 9-year-old fights for his life.

As the darkness settled over Prince George County, the investigation was just beginning. Our camera was kept at a distance, but we could see flashing police lights surrounding the water, and nervous onlookers who were waiting for the latest word.

It was around 8:00 p.m. Saturday. Authorities say three adults were aboard a 19-foot boat. It was pulling two children -ages 10 and 9- on an inflatable tube. And then, authorities say, the boat made one last ill-fated turn near the water's edge.

"At some point, the tube wound up, or ended up in the woods...the tube was flung into the woods," said Sgt. Tim Worrell with Game and Inland Fisheries.

Authorities said the tube struck a tree. The 10-year-old boy was rushed first to Southside Regional Medical Center, then VCU Medical Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

The 9-year-old survived is also at VCU Medical Center and at last check, remains in intensive care.

Among the adults aboard the boat were the parents of the two children. We're told the 10-year-old and 9-year-old weren't related.

Authorities did not release the names of anyone involved, nor did they say if any charges will be filed at this time.

Stay with NBC12 for new information on this developing story.

Copyright 2012 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

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