Politifact Virginia: George Allen campaign claims - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Politifact Virginia: George Allen campaign claims

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) - U.S. senate candidate George Allen has a long record of public service. A record that is once again under intense scrutiny. Much of that scrutiny comes from claims he's made about himself. Like this one.

His campaign web site claims that Allen: "challenged critics and sentiment that suggested it couldn't be done, reigning in government spending and substantially reducing the size of the state workforce."

Is that true? According to writers of Politifact Virginia the claim by Allen's campaign team is "mostly true".

Let's look at the numbers. Over the course of his four years in office, the number of state employees fell by 10,000, close to 9% of the workforce. But that doesn't necessarily mean that there weren't as many people working for the commonwealth. During that same tenure private contractors rose.

According to Warren Fiske from the Times-Dispatch cutting full time state employees in favor of private contractors doesn't necessarily save any money.

"In the Department of Transportation, they privatized the bridge inspections, and JLARC, the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission, did an audit and found that the privatization actually cost the state $4.7 million more than if it inspected bridges itself," said Fiske.

And you can see all the information behind this week's Politifact Virginia report on their web site, www.politifactvirginia.com and you can see all our past reports on Ryan's political blog, www.decisionvirginia.com.

Copyright 2011 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

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