Henrico County's vehicular pursuit policy - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Henrico County's vehicular pursuit policy

By Evrod Cassimy – bio | email

HENRICO, VA (WWBT) – 7 pages outline the procedure that must be followed whenever a Henrico County police officer becomes involved in a high speed pursuit. These 7 pages can help answer questions about the death of Pastor Anthony Taylor.

"We'd do an after action report of the crash and we look at all of the elements in it," said Henrico Police Chief, Henry Stanley.

According to the Henrico County police pursuit policy, an officer can be held civilly liable for injuries or damages that occur during a pursuit.

"We wanted the officers to know that yes if you do not follow then yes you could possibly subject yourself to violation of law," added Stanley.

26 year old Darryl Harris was behind the wheel of the vehicle, being pursued by Henrico Police. His vehicle slammed into a truck driven by Pastor Taylor, killing him just blocks from his church. Investigators are looking to see if the officers involved followed protocol.

When asked how they determine that a high speed chase is going to compromise the safety of an innocent bystander, Chief Stanley said, "In the policy it leaves it to the discretion of the officer."

The policy explains that a pursuit shall be terminated whenever the initiating officer or a field supervisor determines that the risk to the safety of others outweighs the danger to the community. It also shall be terminated if the pursuing officer is being required to drive at speeds considered to be excessive for environmental or roadway conditions. Richmond Mayor Dwight Jones has called for a review of inter-jurisdiction police pursuits. Chief Stanley told the Richmond Times Dispatch that Richmond Police were not notified that a chase was underway, something Henrico's policy requires.

Copyright 2010 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

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