'Inside Edition' host Norville writes new book - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

INTERVIEW

'Inside Edition' host Norville writes new book

By Ryan Nobles - bio | email

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) - You probably know two-time Emmy award winner Deborah Norville best as the host of Inside Edition, which of course can be seen every day on NBC12 after First at Four.

But Ms. Norville is also an accomplished author and philanthropist and were honored to have her here as our live guest.

Q: We get to see you every day on Inside Edition, and it seems like that show is always on top of the biggest news stories of the day. What do you think separates Inside Edition from other news programs like it?

Q: I was struck by a quote on your web site by Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart "journalists spend too much time worrying about what they have the right to do. And not enough time about what is the right thing to do." You say that quote should be displayed in every newsroom in the country, why?

Q: You are quite an accomplished author, you've written at multiple books that range from advice for parents with kids who have nightmares, to motivational books drawn from your own life experience. Your latest book is called "The Power of Respect" what is that about?

Q: Now I have to admit that I learned something about you today, preparing for this interview. You have a talent with yarn. People seek you out for advice when it comes to knitting. How long has this been a hobby for you?

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