Virginia candidates make their closing argument - NBC12 - WWBT - Richmond, VA News On Your Side

Virginia candidates make their closing argument

By Ryan Nobles - bio | email
Posted by Terry Alexander - email

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) - The polls open in the race for the democratic nomination Tuesday at 6:00 a.m. and Monday candidates are criss-crossing the state making their closing arguments.

Of course, the race for the governor's nomination has brought the biggest headlines and in the waning hours, it is getting very fierce. A race, that at one point featured three candidates who agreed to play fair, has gotten ugly in the hours before voters head to the polls.

"But for one, Creigh Deeds has already been beaten by bob McDonnell, we don't need to go through that again," said Terry McAuliffe.

On the stump in Richmond Monday, Terry McAuliffe, the well financed former DNC chair set to knock Bath County Senator Creigh Deeds down. McAuliffe at one point had comfortable leads in most polls, but two new surveys show Deeds ahead by healthy margins. Deeds said these last ditch attacks show where McAuliffe stands.

"Last minute desperate attacks don't mean anything. It is just a sign of desperation," Deeds said.

Deeds spoke to us by phone. He spent part of his day in southwest Virginia. Meanwhile Brian Moran stumped in his hometown of Alexandria. He was shoring up his base in northern Virginia.  Moran made the argument that democrats can win without northern Virginia and Creigh Deeds can't win in northern Virginia.

"We need someone who's going to win overwhelmingly in northern Virginia. I lead Bob McDonnell in every poll in northern Virginia, in fact, I am the only candidate who leads him in northern Virginia," said Moran.

Each candidate hoping to find that special point that will touch the voters they need. In a race where many people may not participate, but will play an important role in who the commonwealth's next governor will be.

And at this point, no one is willing to make a prediction of what the turnout could be, but no one expects it to be overwhelming. There could be anywhere from only 150,000 to 300,000 Virginians voting Tuesday, which would be less than a 10 percent turnout.

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